Homelands

Homelands

The Clarke Clan may be spread far and wide around the globe but our forefathers in Ancient Ireland first created homelands where Clarkes were dominant and held seats of great power. Our clan may now extend across continents now but our origins lie to the west and north in counties Derry and Donegal and within the west of Ireland in county Galway. All of these regions are worth a visit to discover and explore the lands where the Calrkes lived.

Donegal & Derry

Clarke Homelands

With Breathtaking natural beauty, Donegal is a destination where you are guaranteed a warm welcome from people blessed with a character that ensures you will always enjoy the craic! The rugged Donegal coast has a shoreline etched with a multitude of beautiful bays and glorious sandy beaches. Donegal remains as one of the last true wildernesses left in Europe. It is a land that is a haven to the deer, fox, badger and hare, watched from above by the magnificent silent-winged Golden Eagle. Donegal also boasts world class surfing and windsurfing spots and is a haven for water sports enthusiasts for all over the globe.

County Derry makes up one of the six counties of Northern Ireland. It is located towards the northwest of the province and lies on the west bank of the River Foyle. It also sits on the border with County Donegal . It is home to beautiful landscape and important historical buildings including the famous City Walls of Derry and the Mussenden Temple. Derry is one of five cities in Northern Ireland. It is a 6th century city which is full of history, culture and creativity. It successfully preserved its great 17th century defensive Walls, which in fact were never breached. Meander through the bustling city streets and listen to the echoes of 1450 years of history, marvel at the ever-changing skyline of the city or explore the greater area of County Londonderry with its beautiful green landscape and interesting towns and villages such as the popular seaside resort of Portstewart, Magherafelt and Castlerock. In recent years the city and surrounding countryside have become well known for their artistic legacy, producing Nobel Prize-winning poet Seamus Heaney, poet Seamus Deane, playwright Brian Friel, writer and music critic Nik Cohn, artist Willie Doherty, socio-political commentator and activist Eamonn McCann and bands such as The Undertones. The large political gable-wall murals of Bogside Artists, Free Derry Corner, the Foyle Film Festival, the Derry Walls, St Eugene’s and St Columb’s Cathedrals and the annual Halloween street carnival is a big hit amongst tourists.

Galway

To the west, lying between the lake and the Atlantic, is Connemara – a region of superb scenic grandeur dominated by the rocky mountain range known as the
Twelve Bens. A great many of the inhabitants are Irish speakers, and much of the ancient Gaelic culture is preserved. Galway East, or East of Lough Corrib, is a fertile limestone plain extends to Roscommon.Galway City, known as the City of the Tribes with its seaside suburb of Salthill, is an important tourist centre and a gateway to the scenic areas of the county.
n the 1400s, there began in Galway the rule of the ‘Tribes’, as the leading fourteen families were called. Their names were Athy, Blake, Bodkin, Browne, D’arcy, Deane, ffont, French, Joyce, Kirwan, Lynch, Martin, Morris, and Skerritt

Galway is one of the most stunning Counties in Ireland and need no introduction with rugged coastline and miles of long beach’s to the bustling traditional Irish nightlife, one of our favourite events is the

The Volvo Ocean Race Festival takes place in Galway from 30th June – 8th July . The Volvo Ocean Race is the worlds most prestigious offshore race. The event is a nine-month marathon of the seas, passing through four oceans (Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Southern Oceans) and five continents (Asia, Africa, North America, South Amercia and Europe). The race started in Alicante, Spain on October 29th and sails to Galway from Lorient, France arriving on July 3rd for the biggest party Ireland will see this year. Galway comes alive for this event and is well worth a visit.